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Tennis Elbow Treatment
02 Dec

Tennis Elbow Treatment

Tennis Elbow Symptoms and Treatment

What is tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow is usually the result of every day activity, and you don’t have to play tennis to suffer from it. Tennis elbow or in medical terminology, Lateral Epicondylitis, is a tendinopathy, which means it affects the tendons of your forearm that extend your wrist and fingers. The cause of tennis elbow isn’t exactly known. Most experts believe it is due to small tears that develop in the wrist extensors tendons that can be caused from repetitive movements and overuse. A sudden movement or poor technique in a sport can also cause it, most commonly in racket sports

 

Tennis Elbow Facts

  • 1-3 people get tennis elbow in every 100 people
  • More common in ages 40-50
  • Most common in your dominant arm
  • It can last between 6 months to 2 years, depending on the severity and if left untreated
  • If you have had it once you are more likely to get it again later on in life.

Tennis Elbow Symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow and down the muscles in the forearm
  • Pain worse when gripping objects or shaking someone’s hand
  • Pain when lifting objects or extending your wrist
  • Weak grip
  • Stiff & swollen elbow

How can Physiotherapy help tennis elbow?

Physiotherapy can help you in multiple ways to overcome this elbow pain that is interfering with your work or sport. Physiotherapists can help ease your mind by giving you the proper diagnosis and giving you some education on the pathology and advice on how you can get better.

Tennis Elbow PHYSIO Treatments

  • Soft/Deep tissue release to the wrist extensors
  • Acupuncture to these structures
  • Home exercise program focused on stretching and strengthening
  • Ultrasound therapy
  • Taping techniques for pain relief

Tennis Elbow Self-Help Advice

  • Rest, but not fully as you do not want your elbow to stiffen
  • Avoid repetitive movements that cause pain
  • If it is not possible to avoid a movement, take regular breaks
  • Avoid gripping and lifting objects

    • If not possible, lift with palm facing up
  • Hot and cold packs

    • Hot for stiffness
    • Cold for inflammation and pain
  • Give yourself a massage in the painful area
  • Keep moving
  • Take painkillers if necessary
  • Stretching and strengthening  exercises for your wrist extensors
Signs To Look Out For That You Should See a Physiotherapist
27 Jun

Signs To Look Out For That You Should See a Physiotherapist

Signs To See a Physiotherapist

Physiotherapy is not a treatment that is meant only for elite athletes, or people who are recovering from an injury. You can use the treatment to improve your health in numerous ways. Here are the signs to look out for that you should see a physiotherapist:

– Loss of Balance

Loss of balance may be caused by problems with your inner ear. Typically, the structures in your ear are a vital part of the balance system of your body (called the vestibular system). Any issues or conditions that affect your inner ear can end up leaving you feeling a wide range of symptoms like vertigo, dizziness plus balance disturbance, which are often difficult to live with.

If you have these symptoms, a physiotherapy treatment known as vestibular rehabilitation can overcome the above symptoms. After evaluating your specific need, your physiotherapist can design effective series of eye, neck and head exercises that will help retain your CNS (central nervous system) to recompense for the inner ear issues.

– You Cannot Move as Easily as Before

If you have noticed that you do not feel as flexible or your movement is not as easy as it normally is (for instance, you cannot touch your toes any more), you should see a physiotherapist. A physiotherapist can assess the issue and then provide you with a series of exercises for strengthening your supporting tissues and relaxing your muscles, which allows you to gradually increase your flexibility.

– Pain Lasting Longer than 7 Days

If you experience any soreness or back pain that lasts more than 7 days, you should see a physiotherapist, especially if it is aggravated by sneezing or coughing or restricting your movement.

Physiotherapists are capable of isolating any injuries and then prescribe a rehabilitation programme that will help you or refer you to the suitable specialist if they suspect your pain is a sign of something more sinister.

Treatments for pain include manipulation, massage and exercises for helping you support the damaged body part better plus prevent the injury from occurring again.

– You Have Started to Urinate Uncontrollably

UI (Urinary incontinence) also known as involuntary urination is a very common condition; approximately 3 to 6 million people are suffering from this distressing problem to some extent in the United Kingdom.

It’s more common in women than men, and the condition becomes more likely as people get older; however, that does not mean that people have to live with UI forever. There are generally two main types of UI: urge incontinence and stress incontinence. Stress incontinence occurs when the bladder is under pressure; for example, when you sneeze or cough. Urge incontinence happens when urine leaks as the patient feel a sudden strong urge of passing urine, or soon afterwards: most people suffer from both.

If you are looking for physio in Manchester, you should visit Total Restore. All our physiotherapists are chartered as well as registered with the HPC (Health Professions Council). Our focus is on restoring movement plus function to your body following dysfunction, operation, illness or injury.

What to expect from your physiotherapy treatment
23 Nov

What to expect from your physiotherapy treatment

If you are thinking of taking physiotherapy lessons there are plenty of things that you may be seeking answers for, or you may be undecided whether the treatment is good or bad for you. Physiotherapy is a responsive kind of treatment which is very beneficial to patients if done in the right manner and the right schedule followed to the core. Read more »